Working for a Meal

The osprey was cheerfully eating its meal when out of the blue (sky), a bald eagle tried to lay claim to the half eaten fish. Instead of working for its own food, the eagle would rather have a meal that someone else worked for. And so a duel begins – the larger eagle chasing the osprey as it moves to the sky.

The osprey dropped the morsel of fish and the eagle’s chase proved futile. All the energy the birds spent fighting over the half eaten fish went for naught. The eagle flew back to a tree still hungry; the osprey, spent, landed on a tree trunk exhausted, readying itself for the next catch.

What Galileo Saw

At the limits of what a longish zoom on an APS-C camera can capture. I probably should have set up the camera on the gimbal mount instead of a ballhead to make locating the object easier. This is Jupiter, with the four Galilean moons. Roughly what Galileo saw when he trained his telescope on the largest planet in our solar system.

The moons from left to right are Callisto, Europa, Io and Ganymede

Callisto is barely visible in this picture. It’s the second largest moon in the Jovian system but it has very low reflectivity (albedo), which makes it rather difficult to see with binoculars.

Channeling Renoir (and Manet)

One can keep going to the garden and take the same kind of pictures. Overviews of flowerbeds with a wide angle lens. Macro photographs of bees. And you can come up with some incredible pictures. Here’s the deal, whatever you do. The most important thing that you can do to make a good picture is understand light. That’s it. Photography, after all, captures light reflected from objects. Or light emanating from light sources. Direct lighting. Diffused lighting. Specular lighting. Harsh. Soft. Color temperature. The angle of light in the scene. Background, side, foreground lighting. Light is always there, in every picture that you take. You might as well learn to work with it.

What does this little blurb have to do with these pictures? Well, you can use a combination of diffused lighting and strong back lighting to create pictures that evoke the feel of an impressionist painting. Are these pictures the next van Gogh, Renoir or Manet painting that takes the world by storm. No. Though when I look at them, I feel the beauty that they saw, and know there is still much to be learned. About flowers. About light. About art. About life.

And what lens did I use for these photographs? Not a macro lens. Not a wide angle lens. I was looking for birds, you see, and I saw flowers instead. Yes, that incredible Sony 200-600mm lens.

That Analog Pop

Vinyl sounds great, but those pops! I guess it’s the price to pay when listening to something that sounds a little less clinical.

The Beattles, Norwegian Wood

It’s interesting to see what segments in the music are used by the youtube AI.

Cinema Paradiso

One of the greatest movies in the history of cinema is the great Italian film “Cinema Paradiso.” It won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, but really, this film should have won the award for Best Picture. Truly a masterpiece, with a hauntingly beautiful soundtrack by the peerless Ennio Morricone. As a way to introduce people to this movie, and as a tribute to a truly great composer (who recently died), here is a performance of the theme from “Cinema Paradiso.”

Truly a great film, truly a great soundtrack.