More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.

Depicting a Windy Day

In my earlier write up, I talked about walking around Huntley Meadows on a windy day.  How can one convey motion in a static image?  Blur.  Wind causes motion over time.  Decreasing the shutter speed will introduce blur to an image.  This can be used to an advantage.  Mount your camera on a tripod and pick a shutter speed around 1/20 of a second or even slower.  The result can be interesting.

Why look at the same static pictures of red, orange, yellow, green and brown leaves hanging on the branches of a tree?  Make your picture move.  Introduce blur.

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You can also select a high contrast scene and introduce a little blur.

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Light + Motion = Emotion.