Catoctin in Autumn

A mountain park an hour away from northern Virginia. Shenandoah National Park is a very busy place in mid to late October. A similar view of trees (without the vistas that you see in Shenandoah) can make for a relaxing few hours enjoying the beauty of fall.

Water Music

Inspired by Van Gogh, not Handel. Fall colors reflected in the wavy wetlands of Huntley Meadows.

Life is a series of pictures. Not everything is clear. Even the things that seem to move too fast can be beautiful. A moment in time. A moment in one’s life. Savor it.

More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.

A bird and a snail

Picky, picky, picky.

There is a message here, I think. You must try, even if you don’t succeed. You may even find out that what seems enticing really isn’t for you. Not every effort results in a desired outcome, but effort always imparts experience. Which, in the end, is the key to success. And finding out what you are about.

Fall is Here

Can it be? It’s autumn in the northern hemisphere? Where did summer go? Heck, where did the year go? It has been a rather challenging year for almost everyone. With a scant three months before the page turns and 2020 becomes a memory, it is probably a good time to remember that the hardships and challenges we have endured are what life is about. It is not about jetting to some far off destination. Experiencing the delight of other places or tasting yet another new dish. Life is about living each day the best we can. To be kind and respectful. To watch and listen and learn. We don’t have to agree with what everyone says. Or what everyone does. We must do our part to not harm others. And this means respecting each other as if we are all borne of the same Father. That we are brothers and sisters in the most basic thing that defines each of us. Our DNA says so. Our RNA says so. Does our heart tell the same tale, or do we insist that enlightenment is only for the few? I tend to think it’s for the few. Oh. Check that. That kind of thinking, of allowing ourselves to think that we are better than the other only brings ruin to a community. If this pandemic wracked world has something left to teach us, let it be a simple reminder. A smile, even beneath a mask, still radiates warmth within. We cannot love everyone, but we can respect everyone. And in doing so, perhaps, that respect will become something greater. Something better. Perhaps.

Reflections

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Autumn in Northern Virginia.  Huntley Meadows in Alexandria, Virginia.  In the middle of suburbia, the woods and wetlands remind you of the true beauty that nature brings.

Dark colors, bland rocks, a river and two birds

Somehow, an eagle with a fish, being chased by another eagle, makes dull colors really interesting.  Or not.  These two juvenile bald eagles seem unaware of the bland coloration around them.  There are (a lot of) fish in the water, meals to eat.  Action.  Lots of it.  In bursts.  Sometimes, you can wait for hours and see nothing but the bland brown color of rocks in a river.  Then suddenly, an eagle dives for a fish, sometimes almost in front of you.  Conowingo, in late November and December certainly is a place not lacking in excitement.  If you wait.

Conowingo Dam

If you want to see Bald Eagles in the East Coast of the United States in late fall or early winter, Conowingo Dam is one of the best places to visit in November and December.  Don’t come on weekends – you probably won’t be able to find a good parking spot unless you get there early.  On the weekdays, however, the crowds are still plentiful and there is parking to be had.  Just be careful when you back out of your parking space.  As I was backing out of my spot, a Ford F150 owned by a crew doing work on the dam barreled through the road and took my bumper off.  Now, how a truck going at the supposed speed limit does that (especially since I didn’t see him when I looked behind before driving backwards) does that kind of damage is unexplainable (actually, the driver claimed I backed into him – I said that must be why there is a puncture on the bumper from impact and how the bumper detached itself from the car).

Still, it was a good day to visit.  As with everything, unexpected things happen.  One tries to have a balance in life so that the unexpected does not totally thwart one’s plans.  Things happen.  Deal with it.  But gently, if you can.DSC01889_sDSC01891_sDSC01893_sDSC01894_sDSC01896_s