A Christmas Present

As the day winds down, I turn the TV on and sit transfixed. Mesmerized by the colors and the beauty of the latest Pixar movie – Soul. What can I say. This is another masterpiece from the geniuses at Pixar. This film has so many levels that I think it will take dozens of viewings before I even begin to digest the messages that the movie has to say. The most important thing that it brings to my mind, however, is that we as people waste so much time thinking that things can be so much better that we forget how to live life. It isn’t the glories, the heights of fame and success that defines a person. It’s how we live with our family, how we live in our community. How we touch the ones we love and the people around us. We live a life and we forget that every moment is special. I needed this reminder today. I need to remember this message every day. We obsess and work hard to get somewhere and then when we get there, it often feels like a disappointment. There is an emptiness, a feeling that we must have missed something. What we miss is the part of life that makes it worth living. Being alive means looking around, taking a breath, and watching the world around us. Whether it is in the company of others or in our quiet corner of the house, life is around us. In the warmth of the early morning sun. In the cold stare of Orion as he marches in the winter sky. Life is everywhere. Each step forward, backward, sideways takes us somewhere new. Each step is an opportunity to give meaning to the lives of others. And in so doing, give meaning to our own lives.

More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.

Working for a Meal

The osprey was cheerfully eating its meal when out of the blue (sky), a bald eagle tried to lay claim to the half eaten fish. Instead of working for its own food, the eagle would rather have a meal that someone else worked for. And so a duel begins – the larger eagle chasing the osprey as it moves to the sky.

The osprey dropped the morsel of fish and the eagle’s chase proved futile. All the energy the birds spent fighting over the half eaten fish went for naught. The eagle flew back to a tree still hungry; the osprey, spent, landed on a tree trunk exhausted, readying itself for the next catch.

Fly (and Perch) like a swallow

Isaias has come and gone. We were fortunate that we received a glancing blow from the storm (a couple of inches of rain). The swallows at Huntley Meadows reveled in the slightly cooler temperatures.

And there was one solitary wood duck. There’s probably more, but this one was enjoying the influx of rainwater.

Not Quite Sleepless in Seattle

On the way to an unexpected trip to Manila, the first leg of the trip was a stop at Seattle, Washington.  I have never been to this city and I was hoping that there would be a relatively cloudless view of the surrounding area as the plane approached and landed in Seattle.  Well, it was a fortuitous day indeed.  Hopefully a harbinger of good things to come.  And with the Pixel 2 XL in hand, why not post unedited pictures while in the airport.  So here goes.Maker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-YMaker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-Y

And a welcome sight after five hours.Maker:0x4c,Date:2017-11-22,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-Y

The Seattle music scene (not really, but the guy was good).

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Dark colors, bland rocks, a river and two birds

Somehow, an eagle with a fish, being chased by another eagle, makes dull colors really interesting.  Or not.  These two juvenile bald eagles seem unaware of the bland coloration around them.  There are (a lot of) fish in the water, meals to eat.  Action.  Lots of it.  In bursts.  Sometimes, you can wait for hours and see nothing but the bland brown color of rocks in a river.  Then suddenly, an eagle dives for a fish, sometimes almost in front of you.  Conowingo, in late November and December certainly is a place not lacking in excitement.  If you wait.