More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.

The Spider and the Fly

With summer drawing to a close, these insects should be less troublesome while walking through Huntley Meadows. Of course, the birds will start their fall migration soon (some have already migrated).

Fall Migration

Early fall, it turns out, is one of the best times to go birding in the Washington D.C. area.  Birds are migrating to the more temperate climes of the south.  The number of birds in the area increases temporarily and birders have a field day trying to find all these birds.  Many of the experience birders are enthusiastic about teaching what they know about birds (and photography).  Yellow Rumped Warbler?  Supposedly, they’re at Huntley Meadows Park at the moment.  Can I find them?  Umm, not with a lot of help.  I need to learn how to recognize them first, without relying on the Merlin App from Cornell.

That aside, it is a lot of fun watching the birds fly around Huntley.  There are several variety of woodpeckers hammering away in the woods.  Warblers are frittering about.  While the ospreys are gone, various hawks are salivating to take advantage of the migration time.  Bluebirds abound.  I am still working on getting a good picture of a Belted Kingfisher, but with all these birds around, the hours are not nearly enough to enjoy the company of these fantastic creatures.

Most birds maintain their distance from the photographer.

Every one in a while, a bird or two gets close enough to be able to take a detailed photograph.

Eastern Bluebird

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Eastern Phoebe

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House Wren

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Time to look for that kingfisher.  On the other hand, I hear a warbler, maybe.