They Grow Up Quickly

I took my Sony RX10IV camera to look for tadpoles at Huntley Meadows. It’s really hard getting a picture of a tadpole breaking the surface. I thought some tadpoles had expired, they didn’t move much, but prodded by other tadpoles they moved soon enough. To emphasize the shape of the tadpole, I converted the pictures to black and white and really raised the contrast and sharpened the image. Murky water can be a problem.

Where You Stand Matters

Being in the right place, at the right time, with the right subject, with the wind blowing in your face. Three out of four is okay, but sometimes you need all four things to get the shot you want. Still, good practice on taking pictures of an eagle diving for its meal.

The Watcher

The wood duck is not normally in this tree stump at Huntley Meadows. Then again, it must be interested in what the geese were doing.

Curiosity is a wondrous thing. And not limited to humans.

The Thaw

After several days of cold weather, of on and off snow showers, the morning brought a chill that soon gave way to the warmer days of late February. The ice, little as there was, was melting into water. And Huntley Meadows was wet. Which will suits the gulls and the mergansers just fine.

Seen at Huntley Meadows

Nothing spectacular. Just a few images of things that one can expect to see this time of the year (January) at Huntley Meadows, a local wildlife refuge in suburban Alexandria, Virginia. It’s a great place for a walk and for sightseeing.

Gull
Pattern breakers
Mergansers
Water flowing
Feathers caught in twigs

Same Subject, Different Day

Almost the same time in the morning as the other day, but boy, a little bit of light make a BIG bit of difference.

Drying out
Curiosity
Savoring a snack
Ice cap?
It can be a struggle.
In the end, the fish was cooked.
I hope you enjoyed the show!

Water World

It seems that way, at Huntley Meadows. At least in wintertime. The warblers are harder to find, the wading birds are much more plentiful. And once in a while, an unexpected guest. The clapper trail has left everyone buzzing about. And today was a good day to get a picture of this skittish bird.

And some of the other birds floating about.

The one constant presence at Huntley Meadows – Canadian geese.

And a warbler. Or something like it.

In the thicket of things.

A very quiet day (birdwise)

A nice Saturday morning – sunny and cool. A typical mid Atlantic November day. Huntley Meadows beckoned. It’s never a good sign when you get there a half hour after sunrise and people are leaving. And truth be told, it was three hours of looking for something other than a red winged blackbird. You can hear the kingfisher, but it was far away. You can see the mergansers but they were far away. A blue heron flew in but it was far away. Heck, I probably should have stayed far away from Huntley as well, and catch a few more ZZZs. Oh well, at least there was a collection of water on the ground over some leaves. You just go with the flow. Even if the water is at a standstill (or nearly so).