They Grow Up Quickly

I took my Sony RX10IV camera to look for tadpoles at Huntley Meadows. It’s really hard getting a picture of a tadpole breaking the surface. I thought some tadpoles had expired, they didn’t move much, but prodded by other tadpoles they moved soon enough. To emphasize the shape of the tadpole, I converted the pictures to black and white and really raised the contrast and sharpened the image. Murky water can be a problem.

The Thaw

After several days of cold weather, of on and off snow showers, the morning brought a chill that soon gave way to the warmer days of late February. The ice, little as there was, was melting into water. And Huntley Meadows was wet. Which will suits the gulls and the mergansers just fine.

Seen at Huntley Meadows

Nothing spectacular. Just a few images of things that one can expect to see this time of the year (January) at Huntley Meadows, a local wildlife refuge in suburban Alexandria, Virginia. It’s a great place for a walk and for sightseeing.

Gull
Pattern breakers
Mergansers
Water flowing
Feathers caught in twigs

Water World

It seems that way, at Huntley Meadows. At least in wintertime. The warblers are harder to find, the wading birds are much more plentiful. And once in a while, an unexpected guest. The clapper trail has left everyone buzzing about. And today was a good day to get a picture of this skittish bird.

And some of the other birds floating about.

The one constant presence at Huntley Meadows – Canadian geese.

And a warbler. Or something like it.

In the thicket of things.

Same Place, Different Year

I finally had the chance to visit Huntley Meadows after a few weeks of not having the time to do so. It is a familiar place, but every day brings a different experience. Today, it was a river otter swimming in the first pond. And then, a surprise.

It was early in the morning, on an overcast January day. Haven’t seen this one before.

Still Not Handel – Water Music II

Another Saturday, another walk at Huntley Meadows. This time, on the larger wetland area, the water reflected the yellow flowers on the opposite shore while barely perceptible breeze distorted the mirrored image almost imperceptibly. I waited for a duck, a goose, anything to swim in the middle of the scene while in the corner of my eye I was watching two shorebirds on the same opposite shore. After a while, I started thinking about impressionist paintings, namely the water lilies of Monet. Handel will have to wait.