More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.

Working for a Meal

The osprey was cheerfully eating its meal when out of the blue (sky), a bald eagle tried to lay claim to the half eaten fish. Instead of working for its own food, the eagle would rather have a meal that someone else worked for. And so a duel begins – the larger eagle chasing the osprey as it moves to the sky.

The osprey dropped the morsel of fish and the eagle’s chase proved futile. All the energy the birds spent fighting over the half eaten fish went for naught. The eagle flew back to a tree still hungry; the osprey, spent, landed on a tree trunk exhausted, readying itself for the next catch.

Conowingo Dam

If you want to see Bald Eagles in the East Coast of the United States in late fall or early winter, Conowingo Dam is one of the best places to visit in November and December.  Don’t come on weekends – you probably won’t be able to find a good parking spot unless you get there early.  On the weekdays, however, the crowds are still plentiful and there is parking to be had.  Just be careful when you back out of your parking space.  As I was backing out of my spot, a Ford F150 owned by a crew doing work on the dam barreled through the road and took my bumper off.  Now, how a truck going at the supposed speed limit does that (especially since I didn’t see him when I looked behind before driving backwards) does that kind of damage is unexplainable (actually, the driver claimed I backed into him – I said that must be why there is a puncture on the bumper from impact and how the bumper detached itself from the car).

Still, it was a good day to visit.  As with everything, unexpected things happen.  One tries to have a balance in life so that the unexpected does not totally thwart one’s plans.  Things happen.  Deal with it.  But gently, if you can.DSC01889_sDSC01891_sDSC01893_sDSC01894_sDSC01896_s

Yellow, but not Totally

As I was leaving Green Spring Gardens, I noticed a nicely backlit hedge of yellow flowers.  After a few pictures of the flowers (from behind), I walked up the short incline to take a closer look at the flowers.  Thin clouds close to the horizon diffused the light emanating from the afternoon sun.  Still hints of directionality, but much less harsh.   A good opportunity to take some flower close ups.  In the midst of all the yellow, there were insects hovering about. Before I started taking pictures with my macro lens, I never really paid attention to the bees flying about.  I was more concerend about that random bee sting not being so random.  It turns out that bees, for the most part, are more intent on sipping nectar than aiming that stinger on an unsuspecting photographer.  And, they are pretty good models to boot.  Just don’t touch them.

I have to say it.  Mellow yellow, with a twist.

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